One of the most radical things you can do is to actually believe women when they talk about their experiences. — Anita Sarkeesian (Anita Sarkeesian shares the most radical thing you can do to support women online | The Verge)

(via beatsthatarefunky)

a-ghra-geal:

starscreamsswayinghips:

shamelesslyunladylike:

himitsubasa:

copperkiwi:

ninjaeyecandy:

4gifs:

Bully messes with karate champ. [video]

The source video is very, very worth watching. A few things to point out:
The young woman in the dark coat is continually trying to escape from the man. She has spoken to him, she’s pulled away, she’s even tried to walk away before he dragged her back. She hit him as a last resort but it didn’t do anything, he just got more aggressive.
The girl in the white jacket was walking by, recognized that a bad situation was happening, stopped, and intervened. At 0:28 she calls the man out, and continues to call him out until he breaks off attacking the young woman in the dark coat and turns his aggression on her. At which point she defends herself—and then she escorts the young woman in the dark coat safely away.
This is a hero.

Bringing this back.

GIRL POWER

The woman in the white jacket is Olga Ivanova, taekwondo world champion. That kick must have hurt like hell.

Tae Kwon Do Champion. You fucked up, bro.

I do not understand how men are comfortable instigating a physical altercation with their partner in public in broad daylight. Men have no shame, no fear and it’s terrifying.

a-ghra-geal:

starscreamsswayinghips:

shamelesslyunladylike:

himitsubasa:

copperkiwi:

ninjaeyecandy:

4gifs:

Bully messes with karate champ. [video]

The source video is very, very worth watching. A few things to point out:

The young woman in the dark coat is continually trying to escape from the man. She has spoken to him, she’s pulled away, she’s even tried to walk away before he dragged her back. She hit him as a last resort but it didn’t do anything, he just got more aggressive.

The girl in the white jacket was walking by, recognized that a bad situation was happening, stopped, and intervened. At 0:28 she calls the man out, and continues to call him out until he breaks off attacking the young woman in the dark coat and turns his aggression on her. At which point she defends herself—and then she escorts the young woman in the dark coat safely away.

This is a hero.

Bringing this back.

GIRL POWER

The woman in the white jacket is Olga Ivanova, taekwondo world champion. That kick must have hurt like hell.

Tae Kwon Do Champion. You fucked up, bro.

I do not understand how men are comfortable instigating a physical altercation with their partner in public in broad daylight. Men have no shame, no fear and it’s terrifying.

(via beatsthatarefunky)

di-johnlock:

It’s not over, don’t forget

di-johnlock:

It’s not over, don’t forget

(via beatsthatarefunky)

fullghettoalchemist:

final fantasy x truly came out 13 years ago like what the fuck I feel eligible for AARP.

xorevengexo:

standbyfortitanfall:

lightthefuze:

why do guys look so hot when they drive

cos we’re too stupid to work the air conditioning

Lmao

decolonizingmedia:

Decolonizing MMIW Campaigns and the Spectacle of Sexual Violence: 
Further to our post on Twitter, we are concerned about the rise of campaigns, like Spirit of Our Sisters, that position themselves as supporting and raising awareness about MMIW, but are created by photographers who themselves participate in further sexualizing young Indigenous women through media representation. 
This is both hypocritical and deeply problematic. We need to be attentive to how easily these narratives can be co-opted. Images are the currency of internet culture and we shouldn’t allow this double standard to be perpetuated without us calling image makers to account for their work—on all platforms and projects.   
Decolonize the spectacle of missing and murdered Indigenous women. 

decolonizingmedia:

Decolonizing MMIW Campaigns and the Spectacle of Sexual Violence:

Further to our post on Twitter, we are concerned about the rise of campaigns, like Spirit of Our Sisters, that position themselves as supporting and raising awareness about MMIW, but are created by photographers who themselves participate in further sexualizing young Indigenous women through media representation. 

This is both hypocritical and deeply problematic. We need to be attentive to how easily these narratives can be co-opted. Images are the currency of internet culture and we shouldn’t allow this double standard to be perpetuated without us calling image makers to account for their work—on all platforms and projects.   

Decolonize the spectacle of missing and murdered Indigenous women. 

(via idlenomore)

(via kirinium)